Dentist in Madison Heights | How to Keep a Healthy Tongue

Madison Heights Dentist

When it comes to oral health, protecting your teeth and gums are often the focus. However, did you know that your tongue needs proper care as well? Your tongue is responsible for many essential functions like swallowing, tasting, and talking, but it can harbor bacteria that harms your oral health. Learn how to keep your tongue healthy by following these four treatment tips.

Practice Optimal Oral Hygiene

Brushing and flossing twice a day will protect your mouth from pesky bacteria, but make sure to brush your tongue as well. As an alternative, try using a tongue scraper once a day. Tongue scrapers will scrape away any build up that has formed on your tongue.

Drink Plenty of Water

If you are dehydrated, it’s possible for your tongue to lose moisture and become uncomfortable. Drinking water ensures your hydration and will wash away food particles and bacteria from the surface of your tongue. Proper hydration can also prevent bad breath.

Maintain a Healthy Diet

Your tongue is a muscle, and what you eat can affect its health. Fill your diet with foods that are rich in vitamins and minerals, calcium, lean protein, and fiber. Avoid eating processed foods and treats that are filled with sugar.

Visit our Dental Office

By visiting your dentist at least twice a year for a routine cleaning and examination, you can protect your tongue, teeth, and the rest of your mouth. During these visits, we will thoroughly check all aspects of your oral health. We will then work with you to create an oral health plan that is tailored to your needs.

Don’t let your oral health slip by neglecting proper care for your tongue! Put these four tips into practice so you can enjoy a bright and healthy smile. Contact our office today to learn more about proper oral care or to schedule your next appointment.

255 W 13 Mile Rd.
Madison Heights, MI 48071

(248) 583-9888

Madison Heights Dentist | How to Protect Your Teeth from Sensitivity

Dentist Near Me

Dealing with sensitive teeth can prove to be a challenge, but there are ways to fight back. Teeth sensitivity can be caused by many activities or underlying issues, so use our guide to find out what might be the source of yours.

  1. Plaque and Decay – Plaque builds up on your teeth over time from bacterial presence. If left untreated, plaque can harden, eating away at enamel and gum tissue, and causing sensitivity or pain. Make sure you follow a regular schedule of cleanings to prevent too much build-up from happening.
  2. Dental Damage – If damage has chipped or cracked a tooth, then the sensitive inner layers can be exposed and cause pain or irritation. Dental bonding can restore both function and appearance, protecting your inner layers.
  3. Gum Disease – Gum disease, whether from smoking, plaque, or other sources, can cause your gum-line to recede and expose the dentin, or middle layer of your teeth. This can lead to sensitivity around your gum line. Regular cleanings can help prevent gum disease.
  4. Over-brushing – By using too much force when brushing your teeth, you can wear down the enamel, or outer layer. Without the enamel there to protect the underlying layers, your teeth may become sensitive over time.
  5. Acidic or Sugary Drinks – Acids and sugars in drinks (or food) can erode your teeth, exposing the sensitive inner layers. Make sure to rinse with water after enjoying them and before you brush to help guard against this.
  6. Bruxism – Grinding or clenching your teeth can wear them down, exposing the dentin layer. Night guards can help reduce the effects of bruxism, while meditation or other forms of stress-relief can diminish the frequency of bruxism.
  7. Teeth Whitening – Whitening treatment can temporarily cause sensitivity, so make sure to take special care of your teeth during that timeframe.

Tooth sensitivity is not usually harmful on its own, but it may be indicative of an underlying issue such as gum disease or tooth decay. If you are suffering from sensitive teeth, be sure to see us to diagnose the source. Contact our office to schedule an appointment.

255 W 13 Mile Rd.
Madison Heights, MI 48071

(248) 583-9888